Online learning

I see four basic models for online learning:

Model 1: Your own pace

Model 2: Virtual classroom

Model 3: Remote classroom

Model 4: The voyeur

Also:

It’s not obvious that teachers have the right skillset to create online courses.

The key skillset for a lecturer:

  • Knowledge of the content
  • Personable delivery
  • Ability to grade exams

The key skillset for an online instructor:

  • Ability to curate content (a great source for videos are TED Talks and Learn Liberty)
  • Aptitude with alternative technologies
  • Choice of assessment

I see a major advantage for online courses being the opportunity to crowdsource and aggregate grading into quick, responsive, 360 feedback. My ideal grading system would be:

  • A web form to enter information and then WHAM it converts it into a report.
  • Students see each others and vote on which are the best ones.
  • Or, it just prints them all out and I grade them in one batch.

In terms of technology there’s a few different ways to create content:

  1. Powerpoint with voiceover – this is probably the simplest, and I have several examples. There’s also products such as Adobe Spark that perform the same function but slightly slicker.
  2. Dual video and slides – this is a great way to convey detailed content but in a personalised way (e.g. Andy Field)
  3. Video – this is the simplest way to do it but I find it a little awkward when done as a lecture. If it’s more informal it’s more engaging, but slightly more complicated to plan. Using a light board is probably the best way to do this.
  4. Interactive powerpoint – for my EMIB course we had an interactive green screen. This puts the presenter inside the screen and permits interaction (e.g. drawing directly on the screen). It’s basically reading the weather. It’s harder to plan but the final result can be quite effective.